Archive For: ATSIHIV News

Medicare ineligible PLHIV in Australia An analysis of new data with recommendations for systemic improvements

Medicare ineligible PLHIV in Australia An analysis of new data with recommendations for systemic improvements

October 2019 This NAPWHA report is an analysis drawing together several years’ worth of data from the main pharmaceutical industry suppliers of compassionate access antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in Australia and combines this with, for the first time, data from the State and Territory jurisdictions to produce the most accurate estimate ... Read More
 
THE NOONGAR BOODJA STATEMENT  ON CLOSING THE GAP ON STIs, & BBVs AMONG INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF AUSTRALASIA

THE NOONGAR BOODJA STATEMENT ON CLOSING THE GAP ON STIs, & BBVs AMONG INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF AUSTRALASIA

SEPTEMBER 16 2019 The signatories to this statement gather for the Australasian HIV & AIDS and Sexual Health Conferences 2019 in Perth – traditional lands of the Noongar Whadjuk peoples, and the 41st New Zealand Sexual Health Conference 2019 in Wellington – traditional lands of the peoples of Ngāti Toa and Taranaki Whānui ki te ... Read More
 
Trial of HIV prevention implant hailed as boost in fight against disease

Trial of HIV prevention implant hailed as boost in fight against disease

July 24, 2019 An implant containing an HIV-prevention drug has been trialed in humans, in a step experts have hailed as an exciting development in curtailing infections. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, with antiretroviral drugs has become a hot topic in recent years, with the drugs shown to substantially reduce the risk of contracting HIV from ... Read More
 

 

August 12, 2019 

A bottle of Atripla, the first once-daily regimen for treatment of the HIV-1 infection in adults, sits on the podium at the conclusion of a press conference announcing the drug’s approval by the Food and Drug Administration, at the National Press Club, Wednesday, July 12, 2006 in Washington, D.C. Since the introduction of azidothymidine in 1987 there have been major improvements in the treatment of HIV. In a recently published study, Forsythe and colleagues demonstrate that the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the mid 1990s has yielded significant achievements in global public health. Between 1995 and 2015, 9.5 million deaths have been averted worldwide, and global economic benefits are estimated at over $1 trillion.

In 2014, the United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS established the 90-90-90 treatment targets for the year 2020. These targets aim to have 90% of people living with HIV know their HIV status; 90% of those who are diagnosed receive continuous treatment; and 90% have viral suppression. The year 2020 is around the corner. Denmark appears to have been the first country to have achieved all three 90-90-90 targets. But, other countries have not achieved this kind of success. To illustrate, the percentage of HIV-infected people who have viral suppression is 61% in the U.K, and only 30% in the U.S.

If treatment scale-up of ART achieves the global 90-90-90 targets of the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, a total of nearly 35 million deaths are projected to be averted between 1995 and 2030. Moreover, approximately 40 million new HIV infections could also be prevented by ART, and economic gains could reach over $4 trillion by 2030. However, both in terms of prevention of HIV transmission and treatment of the disease significant challenges remain. In 2017 there were 1.8 million new HIV infections and almost 40 million people living with HIV worldwide. Also, there were one million AIDS-related deaths. And, of people living with HIV, 41% were not receiving treatment.

It’s agreed that continued expansion of treatment scale-up to reach the 90-90-90 targets constitutes good value for money for government authorities and payers in every global region. However, different jurisdictions must overcome different sets of barriers to realize these gains. In Europe, the main issue has been getting people to test for HIV. In the U.S., the persistent problem has been linkage with and retention in care: That is, a high proportion of people living with HIV knows their status but has not started or stayed on treatment.

And, invariably, a limiting factor is health budget constraints worldwide. This applies to all aspects of HIV treatment, from diagnostics, to the logistics of supply and storage of medicines, to treatment and follow-up. And, as transmitted and acquired resistance increases worldwide, individual patient viral load monitoring will be critical, as well as judicious use and reimbursement of second- and third-line ART medications.

Joshua Cohen

 
World Health Organisation say PrEP services could reduce other STIs

World Health Organisation say PrEP services could reduce other STIs

July 23 2019 Representatives from the World Health Organisation (WHO) have released the results of an extensive review, highlighting an opportunity for PrEP programs to bring down incidences of other STIs with better integration and coordination. Speaking at the 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science in Mexico City, ... Read More
 
HIV diagnoses in Australia hit 18-year low, but there is still a way go

HIV diagnoses in Australia hit 18-year low, but there is still a way go

July 3, 2019 Australia has solidified its reputation as a world leader in HIV prevention, recording its lowest number of new HIV cases in almost two decades. However, challenges remain in reducing transmission among heterosexuals and the Indigenous population. Key points: 835 HIV diagnoses in 2018, compared to 2,412 at peak of epidemic in 1987 ... Read More
 
Australian man appears to have cleared HIV from his body

Australian man appears to have cleared HIV from his body

20 Jun 2019 Researchers have reported that an Australian man who was HIV positive appears to have shed the virus without medical intervention. The extremely rare case, involves a patient who appears to have spontaneously cleared his own HIV infection without any medication, many years after he was first infected. However “Subject C135” appears to ... Read More
 
There’s a ‘hidden epidemic’ of diseases like chlamydia and syphilis, and dating apps may only be part of the problem

There’s a ‘hidden epidemic’ of diseases like chlamydia and syphilis, and dating apps may only be part of the problem

A June 6 report from the World Health Organisation (WHO) found that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are spreading at an alarming rate worldwide, with 1 million new STIs occurring in people between the ages of 15 and 49 every day. WHO identified gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, and trichomoniasis(a parasitic STI that can lead to genital inflammation) ... Read More